Wednesday, December 4, 2013

Insecure Writers Support Group

Purpose: To share and encourage. Writers can express doubts and concerns without fear of appearing foolish or weak. Those who have been through the fire can offer assistance and guidance. It’s a safe haven for insecure writers of all kinds!
 
 Posting: The first Wednesday of every month is officially Insecure Writer’s Support Group day. Post your thoughts on your own blog. Talk about your doubts and the fears you have conquered. Discuss your struggles and triumphs. Offer a word of encouragement for others who are struggling. Visit others in the group and connect with your fellow writer - aim for a dozen new people each time. Click HERE for the full list of blogs.


Last week I sent a my novel off to an editor for copy edits. In about two weeks I'll get it back coated in red, or whatever color she chooses to use for her comments. I had a sample edits done with a couple of prospects before deciding on this editor, and she was the only one who did anything other than highlight random punctuation and spelling errors. I'm excited to see what comes back to me, but not very excited to go through and fix all of those errors.

In the meantime, as I move closer to my goal of self publishing next year, I've started worrying about how Weaver will be received by the public. I've had it critiqued and beta'd and I've read it several times myself. I tried so hard to keep it from slowing down too much in the middle, and make the ending make sense. I debated the usefulness of a tertiary character and decided I liked him too much to get rid of him. Some people might think the ending is a little bit of a downer, but it was how it had to end. But what I like, will anyone else like it?

I might have said it before, I don't remember and I really don't feel like checking it out now, that I don't expect to get rich off of writing. I don't expect to be able to quit my day job (if I had a day job to quit, considering this is my last day of work - in case you missed my post last month I was laid off), and to be honest, I don't think I'd make enough to buy dinner at Red Lobster. At this point, I just want people to honestly like it.

Oh, Jennifer, I hear you saying. You'll get those cheddar bay biscuits at Red Lobster. You might even be able to get the Shrimp Trio. Well, hypothetical readers and commenters, I have convinced myself to set the bar reeeaaally low. If I can get one person to pay hard earned cash for my novel, and like it enough to give me 3 stars on Amazon I'll be a happy camper.

Also, that person can't be my mother. Hi Mom.

So, that's my insecurity and misguided attempt at dealing with it. How's it going with all of you?

6 comments:

  1. Don't set that bar so low! I believe that if you're really called to do something in life, then that doesn't mean you won't succeed. Okay, well, maybe that depends on what success means to you. If it means shrimp at Red Lobster, then maybe you're on the right path...Best of luck in getting your book out there! (I'm pretty sure you'll have more than one buyer!) ;)

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  2. I try to do this, but somehow I'm always disappointed anyway, even if my very low expectations are met. I think my subconscious has higher expectations, and there's not much I can do about that. Good luck with your self-publishing!

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  3. I promise- I'll get you're book, and I can't imagine I wouldn't love it.

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    1. So, I'll just put you down for a dozen copies then? :)

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  4. You'll be fine. One of the best books I ever bought for my writing life is, Self-Editing for the fiction writer by Renne and King. My writing improved so much that now my editor has to hunt to find problems. I know how you feel though, hang in there. Many more than just one will buy your book.

    Thanks for your kind words on my post.
    Nancy

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  5. I was worried about the same thing the first time I worked with an editor: that there'd be a whole bunch of things I needed to fix. And there were. She pointed out a whole bunch of embarrassing mistakes I'd made (never knew the was a difference between the words border and boarder before), but it was a hugely rewarding experience because for the first time I really felt like I wasn't doing this by myself. I was afraid it would feel like getting an essay back from a teacher, but instead it felt like I'd found a companion to help me on the journey of writing. I hope, if your editor's any good, that you'll feel much the same.

    -James

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I love hearing from people, and constructive criticism is always welcome.